Helping to keep History relevant: Multimedia and authentic learning

Peter Hillis, Drew Calderhead

Abstract

The subject based curriculum attracts lively debate in many countries being accused of fragmenting teaching and learning, erecting artificial barriers and failing to teach the skills required in the twenty first century (Hazlewood 2005). Cross-curricular rich tasks are increasingly seen as the means to develop relevant knowledge, understanding and skills. Over the past fourteen years we have developed and evaluated a series of interactive multi-media resources for primary and secondary schools on themes within Scottish History. The generally positive evaluation given to these resources by pupils and teachers points to some ways in which subjects such as history can remain challenging and relevant. The relevance has largely stemmed, in the case of the multi-media resources, from combining the historian's traditional role of problemising the past, with a wide range of primary and secondary sources, new technologies and learning tasks encompassing critical skills/authentic learning. Consequently, we argue that subjects must in future embrace new technologies and authentic learning to maintain their place in the school curriculum.

Editors: Patrick McAndrew (Open University, UK).

Reviewers: Terry Haydn (University of East Anglia, UK) and Steve Godwin (Open University, UK).


View the full article: Full text PDF

How to cite: Hillis, P and Calderhead, D 2009. Helping to keep History relevant: Multimedia and authentic learning. Journal of Interactive Media in Education 2009(1):4, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5334/2009-2

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License
(http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Copyright is retained by the author(s).

This article has been peer reviewed (journal peer review policy).

Published on 22 September 2009.

ISSN: 1365-893X | Published by Ubiquity Press | Creative Commons License This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License.